Mr. and Mrs. President

From the Trumans to the Clintons

Second Edition, Revised

Gil Troy

It began with Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt. It accelerated with Jack and Jackie Kennedy. Lady Bird and Lyndon Johnson became partners in office and Nancy and Ronnie seemed joined at the hip. Without question, the presidential couple has arrived as a force in politics. Yet surprisingly, the electorate is not happy about it.

The emergence of the presidential couple is one of the most important and contentious developments in America's postwar political history. Its citizens' reaction to the First Couple reflects the country's changing morality, its uncertain attitude toward feminism, and the increasing power of the media. Gil Troy traces these shifts through ten presidential marriages, from the homesick tensions between Harry and Bess Truman to the very public scandals endured by Bill and Hillary Clinton. Along the way, readers learn of Mamie Eisenhower's perseverance on her husband's campaign trail, Gerald Ford's embarrassment over Betty's outspoken honesty, and the amazing political success of Nancy and Ronald Reagan's partnership in office. With a new chapter devoted to Hillary and Bill Clinton's tainted partnership in office and to our present First Lady's senatorial ambitions, this edition of Gil Troy's Mr. and Mrs. President offers fresh insights into America's paradoxical expectations for its presidential wives and husbands.

“Troy argues that the rise of the First Couple is not simply a function of the women’s movement, but reflects a mixture of factors, including the weakening of parties, the rise of personality politics, the increasing power of the Presidency and the Federal Government and perhaps, most important of all, the ‘rise of the mass media and the new political culture it spawned.’”

New York Times Book Review

“A must read for anyone interested in the presidential marriage. Recommended for a broad audience.”

Presidential Studies Quarterly
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"Troy argues that the rise of the First Couple is not simply a function of the women's movement, but reflects a mixture of factors, including the weakening of parties, the rise of personality politics, the increasing power of the Presidency and the Federal Government and perhaps, most important of all, the 'rise of the mass media and the new political culture it spawned.'"—New York Times Book Review.

About the Author

Gil Troy, a native of Queens, New York, is professor of history at McGill University in Montreal and the author of See How They Ran: The Changing Role of the Presidential Candidate.